Conte Antonio

Antonio Conte is an Italian former player. Playing as a midfielder, Conte began his career at local club Lecce and later became one of the most decorated and influential players in the history of Juventus. He captained the team and won the UEFA Champions League, as well as 5 Serie A titles, among other honours. He also played for the Italian national team and was a participant at the 1994 FIFA World Cup and the 2000 UEFA European Championship, where, on both occasions, the Italians finished runners-up. Considered to be one of the most important Italian midfielders of his generation, Conte was regarded as a quick, combative, energetic, and tactically versatile footballer throughout his career who could play anywhere in midfield but was usually deployed as a central, box-to-box, or defensive midfielder, and occasionally on the right flank, due to his crossing ability. Although he was not the most naturally talented or skilful footballer from a technical standpoint, Conte was a hard-working, consistent, and intelligent player, with an innate ability to read the game, who was mainly known for his leadership, strong mentality, accurate tackling, stamina, and vision; these attributes, coupled with his solid first touch, work-rate, tenacity, and a tendency to make offensive runs into the area, enabled him to aid his team effectively both defensively and offensively, and gave him the ability to distribute the ball and start attacking moves after retrieving possession, as well as the capacity to turn defence into an attack. Due to his ball striking from distance and ability to get forward, he also scored some spectacular and decisive goals, often from volleys and strikes from outside the area. He was also considered to be physically strong, good in the air, and accurate with his head, despite not being particularly tall. 

JUVENTUS F.C.


1997-1998


Champions League Final


Real Madrid vs Juventus


Match Worn Shirt

Things to Know:

During 1997/1998 the team used two different kind of Champions League badges. The regular one used during the whole season was embroidered on sleeve. The second one was only used during the Final vs Real madrid and it was a Champions League ironed patch as it was used the following years. 

Did you Know?

The 1998 UEFA Champions League Final was a football match that took place at the Amsterdam Arena in Amsterdam, Netherlands on 20 May 1998 to determine the winner of the 1997–98 UEFA Champions League. It pitted Real Madrid of Spain and Juventus of Italy. Juventus appeared in their third consecutive final, while Real Madrid were in their first of the Champions League era. Real Madrid won 1–0, the only goal scored by Predrag Mijatović, to clinch their seventh European title, their first for 32 years.

This Champions League badge was used only during the Final vs Real Madrid

Things to Know:

1997-1998 season was the Centenary season of Juventus F.C. In honor of the first team’s shirt, that it was pink, a special 100th Anniversary shirt has been made for the team for all of the competitions (Serie A and Champions League included). But Giovanni Agnelli, team’s owner never liked the pink color, so at the end this shirt’s style was only used during the friendly pre-season game vs Newcastle which took place in Cesena on August 3rd 1997. It was second time that Giovanni Agnelli stop the team to play with fancy shirts. The same thing happened in 1995/1996 when a pois shirt was ready to be used but he stopped it. 

JUVENTUS F.C.


1997-1998


100th Anniversary Shirt


Juventus vs Newcastleù


Friendly Game


Match Worn Shirt

JUVENTUS F.C.


2001-2002


Udinese vs Juventus


Match Worn Shirt

The highlights of Udinese-Juventus through the words of Juventus coach Marcello Lippi.

Things to Know:

On 5 May 2002, Juventus completed a remarkable run to the Serie A title, thanks in part to a season-end collapse by Inter. It was the last day of the season and Inter had been at the top of the table since 24 March. On 30 March, they had a six-point lead over Juventus, who were then in third, with Roma in between. But Juve went on an unbeaten run to climb into second, while an Inter loss to Atalanta and draw with Chievo saw their lead shrink to a single point. Roma had dropped to third, but were separated from the top by only two points. All three teams were away for their final matches of the season, Inter at Lazio, Juventus at Udinese, and Roma at Torino. In his pre-match conference, Roma manager Fabio Capello took a fatalistic approach to the day, saying that he expected all three teams to win, leaving the table unchanged.
As it turned out, he was two-thirds correct. Both Juventus and Roma went on to win–0-2 and 0-1, respectively–but Inter fell hard to Lazio. Despite taking a 1-2 lead in the first half, they went into the break level at 2-2, then surrendered a pair of second-half goals to fall 4-2.
The results pushed Juventus into first, Roma into second, and Inter into third. Since then the May 5th became a very important date for the Juventus fans and it especially became the date to fool Inter’s fans around. 

2018-10-20T10:12:49+00:00