JUVENTUS F.C.


1995-1996


Match Worn Shirt


Trotta Ivano

JUVENTUS F.C.


1995-1996


Match Worn Shirt


Jugovic Vladimir

Did you Know?

This season the team used two different versions of name set on the back. In the very first Serie A games names on the back were printed on a plastic strip ironed on the back. But these strips were falling down easily during the game so the team’s supplier Kappa changed the style of names on the back in a smoother way, with single name’s letters ironed directly on the shirt. 

Things to Know:

Vialli moved to Juventus shortly after the 1992 European Cup final loss for a world record fee of £12.5million. Vialli won the UEFA Cup in his first season with Juventus playing alongside players such as Roberto Baggio, Pierluigi Casiraghi, Paolo Di Canio, and Andreas Möller, among other players, under manager Giovanni Trapattoni. Following the arrival of manager Marcello Lippi, Vialli underwent an intense fitness and muscle strengthening training regime in order to lose weight, and gain speed, agility, physical strength, and stamina. Vialli refound his goalscoring form throughout the season, and through his leadership and decisive performances, he helped Juventus win the Scudetto (his second overall) and the Italian Cup in 1995, scoring 16 goals during the season; the club also narrowly missed out on a treble after suffering a defeat in the 1995 UEFA Cup Final to Parma, despite Vialli scoring a spectacular second leg goal. He ended his time in Turin by captaining the side to a Supercoppa Italiana victory and a Champions League final win over defending champions Ajax Amsterdam in 1996, playing alongside Del Piero and Fabrizio Ravanelli. During his four seasons with the club he totaled 102 appearances, scoring 38 goals.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1995-1996


Champions League


Juventus-Nantes


Match Worn Shirt


Vialli Gianluca

JUVENTUS F.C.


1995-1996


Pre Season


Match Worn Shirt

Did you Know?

This shirt is a pretty rare shirt since SONY MINIDISC sponsor was used by the team only for the pre season’s games. It was never used during the Serie A nor Champions League games. All of the pre season friendly games instead were played this way.

Did you Know?

Di Livio tireless running and quality crossing made him an important element in the dominant Juventus starting lineup from 1993 to 1999, during one of the most successful periods in the club’s history. With Juventus, he won three scudetti (Italian A League; 1995, 1997, 1998) and one Champions League title (1996), in addition to two Italian Supercups (1995, 1997), a Coppa Italia, an UEFA Supercup (1996), and an Intercontinental Cup (1996); he also reached the final of the 1994–95 UEFA Cup. In 1999, he moved to Fiorentina.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1995-1996


Match Worn Shirt


Di Livio Angelo

JUVENTUS F.C.


1995-1996


Champions Leaue


Real Madrid vs Juventus


Match Worn Shirt

Things to Know:

The team finished second in Serie A but after 11 years since the cursed Heysel night won the Champions League. The final was played against Ajax and the result was 4–2 on penalties in Rome. Fabrizio Ravanelli scored the goal in the regular time before the penalties. Ferrara, Pessotto, Padovano and Jugovic scored the penalties and Peruzzi saved two penalties in order to let captain Gianluca Vialli lifting the trophy.

Did you Know?

This shirt is a regular 1995/1996 goalkeeper shirt but with an unknown number on the back. It’s an old number from the season 1993/1994 but not from the 1995/1996 season. Scudetto and Coppa Italia badges are embroidered as only player’s shirts were but the number on the back is really weird. It comes from Michelangelo Rampulla so they probably played some friendly match and the kitman had to make some tricks.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1995-1996


Match Worn Shirt


Friendly


Rampulla Michelangelo


JUVENTUS F.C.


1995-1996


Match Worn Shirt


Rampulla Michelangelo


Things to Know:

Rampulla moved to Juventus in 1992, where he enjoyed a highly successful 10-year spell at the club; he initially played as a starter, replacing Juventus’s former legendary goalkeeper Stefano Tacconi, and subsequently as back-up goalkeeper for the remainder of his career, behind Angelo Peruzzi, Edwin van der Sar, and Gianluigi Buffon, and later as the reserve goalkeeper behind Andreas Isaksson and Fabian Carini, retiring from active football in 2002, following Juventus’s Serie A title victory and Coppa Italia final defeat. Despite being predominantly a backup, he played matches in every competition for Juventus during almost every season of his Juventus career. During his time at the club, he won an UEFA Cup (as a starter), a Coppa Italia (as a starter), 4 Serie A titles, 2 Supercoppe Italiane, an UEFA Champions League, an UEFA Super Cup, an Intercontinental Cup, and an UEFA Intertoto Cup.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1996


Champions League


Player’s Trophy

Did you Know?

The 1996 UEFA Champions League Final was a football match played in Rome on 22 May 1996 between Juventus of Italy and Ajax of the Netherlands. The match ended in a 1–1 draw after extra time, forcing a penalty shoot-out, which Juventus won 4–2. It was the club’s second triumph in the competition.

Things to Know:

The team played the first half season with SONY sponsor and the second half season with extended sponsor SONY MINIDISC. 

JUVENTUS F.C.


1996-1997


Match Worn Shirt


Cingolani Nicola

Did you Know?

Vieri first big move came about when he was spotted by Juventus who signed him from Atalanta for a fee of €2.5 million for the 1996–97 season. He made 23 appearances and scored 8 goals in Serie A, and six goals in ten matches in Europe, making him joint top scorer for Juventus that season along with Alen Bokšić. He ended his season at Juve by winning the ‘Scudetto and starting in the 3–1 UEFA Champions League final loss to Borussia Dortmund.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1996-1997


Champions League


Match Worn Shirt


Vieri Christian

Did you Know?

Mark Iuliano played the whole 1996/1997 season with the name “Juliano” on the back. The kitman before his first game with Juventus wrote his name wrongly on the shirt, but as long as the team won and the player played well, Mark didn’t want to change the name for the whole season.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1996-1997


Match Worn Shirt


Iuliano Mark

JUVENTUS F.C.


1996-1997


Match Worn Shirt


Cingolani Nicola

Nicola Cingolani with Juventus

Things to Know:

As explained before this model with SONY MINIDISC sponsor was only used in the second half of the season.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1996-1997


Champions League Final


Borussia Dortmund vs Juventus


Match Worn Shirt


Montero Paolo

Things to Know:

The 1997 UEFA Champions League Final was a football match played at the Olympiastadion in Munich on 28 May 1997 to determine the winner of the 1996–97 UEFA Champions League. The match was contested by Borussia Dortmund of Germany and Juventus of Italy. Borussia Dortmund won 3–1 with goals from Karl-Heinz Riedle and Lars Ricken; Juventus’ goal was scored by Alessandro Del Piero.

Watch the Final’s highlights.

Did you Know?

The 1996 Intercontinental Cup was a football match played on November 26, 1996, between Juventus, winners of the 1995–96 UEFA Champions League, and River Plate, winners of the 1996 Copa Libertadores. The match was played at the National Stadium in Tokyo. It was Juventus’ third appearance into the competition, after the defeat in 1973 and the victory in 1985 against Argentinos Juniors, whereas it was River Plate’s second appearance after the victory in 1986 against Steaua Bucharest.
Juventus defeated  Argentinos Junior 1-0 and Alessandro Del Piero was named as man of the match and got the only goal of the game when he shot right footed to the top of the net in the 81st minute.

JUVENTUS F.C.


Intercontinental Cup 1996


Match Used Ticket


JUVENTUS F.C.


1996


“Goal del Cuore” Necklace


Luciano Moggi Personal Gift to the Players 


Did you Know?

The “Goal del Cuore”necklace was a personal gift that Luciano Moggi (former Juventus F.C. general manager) was usual to give to the Juventus players while they were scoring important goals for the team.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1997-1998


Bologna vs Juventus


Match Worn Shirt


Zidane Zinedine

Things to Know:

This shirt, was used by Zinedine Zidane during Bologna-Juventus which took place in Bologna on January.18th 1998. The shirt was swapped after the match with Michele Paramatti, Bologna former player. It was auctioned by Paramatti in 2012 for the charity event “Una Maglia per l’Emilia” organized by the player to raise money for people of Emilia Romagna (Italy) who got invloved in the tremendous earthquake of  2012.

Things to Know:

The 1998 UEFA Champions League Final was a football match that took place at the Amsterdam Arena in Amsterdam, Netherlands on 20 May 1998 to determine the winner of the 1997–98 UEFA Champions League. It pitted Real Madrid of Spain and Juventus of Italy. Juventus appeared in their third consecutive final, while Real Madrid were in their first of the Champions League era. Real Madrid won 1–0, the only goal scored by Predrag Mijatović, to clinch their seventh European title, their first for 32 years.


JUVENTUS F.C.


1997-1998


Champions League


Match Worn Shirt


Zidane Zinedine


Things to Know:

During 1997/1998 the team used two different kind of Champions League badges. The regular one used during the whole season was embroidered on sleeve. The second one was only used during the Final vs Real madrid and it was a Champions League ironed patch as it was used the following years. 

This Champions League badge was used during the whole season


JUVENTUS F.C.


1997-1998


Champions League Final


Real Madrid vs Juventus


Match Worn Shirt


Conte Antonio


This Champions League badge was used only during the Final vs Real Madrid

Did you Know?

Beside to the Champions League Final lost against Real Madrid, Juventus won the Serie A. The most important Serie A game on the way to the Scudetto was played in Turin on April 26th 1998. Inter travelled to the Stadio delle Alpi for a much-anticipated Scudetto showdown. Inter had not won the Serie A title in almost a decade but, led by coach Luigi Simoni, they sat just one point behind Juventus with four games of the season remaining. Italian football was in its pomp and the two squads were packed with world-class players. Marcelo Lippi picked a Juventus team that contained Didier Deschamps, Edgar Davids, Filippo Inzaghi, Zinedine Zidane and Alessandro Del Piero. Inter had Javier Zanetti, Diego Simeone, Aron Winter, Youri Djorkaeff and Ronaldo, the Ballon d’Or winner. Despite this wealth of talent on show, none of these stars would be the protagonist of this particular Derby D’Italia. It looks like that honor went to the referee, Piero Ceccarini, who is still asked about the game to this day. Juventus took the lead in the 21st minute. After a series of misplaced passes and scrappy exchanges in midfield, Davids played a smart ball down the left wing to Del Piero, who ran directly at the Inter defence. As he reached the byline he tried to square the ball across the six-yard box. He mishit the cross but the ball fell kindly for him and, with the Inter defence struggling to react, he swung his left boot at the ball and stuck it away from an improbable angle. Inter reacted well, with Ronaldo’s pace clearly unsettling the Juventus defence, but they could not find an equaliser before the interval. When the two sets of players re-emerged for the second half, Ceccarini blew his whistle and started 45 minutes of football that are still debated in Italy – particularly by Inter fans. Inter went looking for the equaliser but squandered chances and, as the half progressed, cynicism began to prevail, with both sides becoming more intent on leaving marks on each other rather than the match. Arguments between players broke up the game’s flow, which suited Juventus, who seemed content to settle for a 1-0 win. Lippi replaced Inzaghi with combative midfielder Antonio Conte and Simoni took off winger Francesco Moriero for Chilean striker Iván Zamorano; Lippi was sticking with what he had, while Simoni desperately needed a goal. Then, in the 69th minute, two refereeing decisions pushed Juventus towards the title and left Inter furious. The game was proceeding scrappily when the ball fell between Simeone and Davids in midfield. The ball was there to be won but Simeone ignored it and swung his boot at Davids’ legs, prompting an inevitable brawl. When things calmed down and Juventus took the resulting free-kick, they surrendered possession cheaply, giving Inter the chance to counter. A long ball from the back was booted up to Ronaldo, who gave chase, battling for it with defender Moreno Torricelli. The ball bounced away from them both and into the path of Zamorano, who carried it into the penalty area before being tackled by Alessandro Birindelli. The ball rolled back into Ronaldo’s path and he poked it past Juventus defender Mark Iuliano, who body-checked him and knocked him to the ground. The Inter players waited for a whistle but it never came. As they continued to protest, Davids – who was perhaps lucky to still be on the pitch – played a long pass forward to Zidane, who stroked the ball between two Inter defenders and into the path of Del Piero. As the forward controlled the ball, Taribo West pushed him in the back and Del Piero went down. This time, Ceccarini blew his whistle and awarded a penalty. The Inter players and staff were incandescent. They surrounded Ceccarini, berating and barging into him, enraged that he would deny them a penalty and then award one to Juventus 15 seconds later. Gianluca Pagliuca came running out of his goal, leading the chase as the referee backpeddled from the crowd of angry Inter players. Simoni joined the demonstration from the touchline and was sent off for calling the referee “shameful”. After the protest relented, Del Piero stepped up to take the kick. He blasted it down the middle and Pagliuca, who had dived to his right, beat it away with his trailing leg. Buoyed by the keeper’s save, Inter went on the attack. But they could not beat Angelo Peruzzi – and when they did put the ball in the net, the goal was ruled out as Zamorano was adjudged to have fouled the Juve goalkeeper. When the final whistle was blown Juventus celebrated and Inter fumed. The enraged Pagliuca nearly ended up in a fight with a Juventus fan, the Gazzetta dello Sport lead with the headline “L’Inter urla vergogna” (“Inter cry disgrace”) and, three days later, the game caused uproar in the Italian parliament, where Domenico Gramazio of the far-right National Alliance party had to be held back as he tried to confront footballer-turned-politician Massimo Mauro, who had won the title with Juventus in the 1980s before joining the Democratic Party. Gramazio reportedly shouted “they are all thieves” during the televised debate, which did not impress the deputy prime minister, Walter Veltroni, who remarked: “We are not at a stadium. This is a spectacle that is unworthy, embarrassing and grotesque.” The whole episode had a detrimental effect on Inter. They drew their next match at home to Piacenza and then lost away to Bari as Juventus wrapped up the title. Their only consolation came in the Uefa Cup final a few weeks later, when goals from Zamorano, Zanetti and Ronaldo gave them a 3-0 win over Lazio in Paris. If anything, Ceccarini has become more certain of his decision over time. “Images show that it is Ronaldo who hit Iuliano, not the other way around. I was on the pitch, just a few metres away from the scene. The defender wants to stop the striker’s run, but Ronaldo moves the ball and doesn’t follow it. He hits Iuliano who is still in the middle of the area. I told Pagliuca that would have been a charging foul in basketball. Actually, I should have probably given a free-kick for Juventus. ”The Derby d’Italia, a derby once based on sporting excellence, became a game weighed down by resentment and ill-feeling within the space of 15 seconds. But the controversies, accusations and lingering bitterness between Juventus and Inter only add to the spectacle.

Watch Juventus-Internazionale highlights

Things to Know:

Although Zalayeta did not play many matches with Juventus, he performed well when given a chance, winning three Serie A titles (1998, 2002, 2003), two Supercoppa Italiana medals (2002 and 2003), and a Serie B title in 2007, also helping the club to the 2002 Coppa Italia Final. During his time at the club, he was given the nickname “Panteron”. He scored two very important extra time winners against Spanish opposition upon his return to Juventus. One came in 2003 in the quarter-finals of UEFA Champions League against Barcelona, the other against Real Madrid in the 2005 round of 16. In the 2003 UEFA Champions League Final, Zalayeta was one of the three Juventus players to have their penalty saved by Milan keeper Dida in the shootout after a 0–0 draw, as Milan won the title.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1997-1998


Match Worn Shirt


Zalayeta Marcelo

Did you Know?

Fabio Pecchia throughout his career, he was also known as “l’avvocato” (the lawyer, in Italian), as he obtained a law degree through the University of Naples.


JUVENTUS F.C.


1997-1998


Champions League


Match Worn Shirt


Pecchia Fabio


JUVENTUS F.C.


1997-1998


100th Anniversary Shirt


Juventus vs Newcastleù


Friendly Game


Match Worn Shirt


Conte Antonio

Things to Know:

1997-1998 season was the Centenary season of Juventus F.C. In honor of the first team’s shirt, that it was pink, a special 100th Anniversary shirt has been made for the team for all of the competitions (Serie A and Champions League included). But Giovanni Agnelli, team’s owner never liked the pink color, so at the end this shirt’s style was only used during the friendly pre-season game vs Newcastle which took place in Cesena on August 3rd 1997. It was second time that Giovanni Agnelli stop the team to play with fancy shirts. The same thing happened in 1995/1996 when a pois shirt was ready to be used but he stopped it. 

Did you Know?

This style of shirt was never used by the team in any Serie A game. This special style was made by team’s supplier Robe di Kappa to celebrate the team’s centenary but the shirt was only used during a friendly game against Newcastle which took place in Cesena on August 3rd 1997.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1997-1998


Match Worn Shirt


Del Piero Alessandro

JUVENTUS F.C.


1997-1998


Champions League


Match Worn Shirt


Tacchinardi Alessio

Things to Know:

This style of shirt was never used by the team in any Champions League game. This special style was made by team’s supplier Robe di Kappa to celebrate the team’s centenary but the shirt was only used during a friendly game against Newcastle which took place in Cesena on August 3rd 1997.

Did you Know?

Because of his stocky physique, Peruzzi was given the nicknames “Tyson” in reference to the boxer Mike Tyson’s similarly powerful build and “The Boar”. A powerful, athletic, and consistent goalkeeper – although injury-prone –, Peruzzi was renowned for his strength, positioning, reactions, speed, and agility, in spite of his sturdy physique; he particularly excelled at rushing off his line to parry the ball on the ground, as well as at anticipating his opponents outside the penalty area.[25]Due to his modest height for a goalkeeper, he was less effective at coming out to collect crosses, and preferred to punch the ball out rather than trying to catch it. While he was extremely gifted acrobatics-wise, he performed spectacular dives only in case of strict necessity: he indeed believed that «a great keeper must walk across the line: this way he disheartens the opposing strikers, because he seems to save shots effortlessly».

JUVENTUS F.C.


1997-1998


Match Worn Shirt


Peruzzi Angelo

JUVENTUS F.C.


1997-1998


Champions League


Player’s Warm Up Shirt & Bib


Did you Know?

1998-1999 was also the season when Thierry Henry arrived in Torino. He moved from Monaco in January 2000. He played on the wing, but he was ineffective against the Serie A defensive discipline in a position uncharacteristic for him, and scored just three goals in 16 appearances. Unsettled in Italy, Henry transferred from Juventus on 3 August 1999 to Arsenal for an estimated fee of £11 million, reuniting with his former manager Arsène Wenger. That was one of the biggest Luciano Moggi’s regret.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1998-1999


Match Worn Shirt


Perrotta Simone

JUVENTUS F.C.


1998-1999


Champions League


Match Worn Shirt


Pessotto Gianluca

Did you Know?

During the season 1998-1999 the team used two different kind of Champions League shirts. In the first part of the season the team played with shirts with no Kappa logos on sleeves. During the second part of the season the team played with shirts with Kappa logos on sleeves.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1998-1999


Champions League


Match Worn Shirt


Davids Edgar

JUVENTUS F.C.


1998-1999


“Primavera”


Match Worn Shirt


JUVENTUS F.C.


1998-1999


Match Worn Shirt


Di Livio Angelo

Things to Know:

The 1998-1999 season was a very troubled season for Juventus F.C. After a good beginning, in November a serious injury occurred to Alessandro Del Piero who had to go on surgery and to stop his activity for almost one year. After his injury the season was very bad with a final 7th position in Serie A. The Uefa Cup playoff’s game against Udinese was lost and Juventus went to Intertoto Cup in order to be qualified for the Uefa Cup 1999-2000. In February after a loss against Parma, coach Marcello Lippi dismissed himself as coach. Carlo Ancelotti became the new team’s coach.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1998-1999


Champions League


Match Worn Shirt


Blanchard Jocelyn

Did you Know?

Jocelyn Blanchard is a retired French footballer who plays as a midfielder. He was an accurate passer of the ball and possesses excellent technique. He has earned a reputation as a key player for his teams, and his main attributes are his tough tackling and stamina. He joined Juventus F.C. in the 1998-1999 season. He played for the team one season only, playing 12 games and 0 scoring.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1998-1999


Champions League


Match Worn Shirt


Pessotto Gianluca

Did you Know?

This blue model with Kappa logos on sleeves was never used during the season.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1998-1999


Match Worn & Signed Shirt


Zidane Zinedine

Did you Know?

In 1998 Zidane won the World Cup with France National Team scoring two goals in the final against Brazil. He also won the Serie A title with Juventus F.C. Due his phenomenal year Zidane in 1998 was named FIFA World Player of the Year, and won the Ballon d’Or. Zidane was named the FIFA World Player of the Year three times, in 1998, 2000 and 2003, and won the 1998 Ballon d’Or. 

Did you Know?

Following the big switch to Turin in 1996, Montero made over 30 appearances in his first season with Juventus in all competitions. It was here, even after an impressive first season, that he achieved great success, winning four scudetti with the club, along with other honours;[4] Montero also won three Italian Supercups, and reached three Champions League finals and two Coppa Italia finals with the club during this period. Montero was believed to have been the best friend of Zinedine Zidane during the pair’s time together at Juventus, which ended when Zidane was sold to Real Madrid in 2001.[3] Juventus were extremely dominant both domestically and internationally during this period, and had what was considered to be the best defense in the world at the time, and teams strongly regretted ever going down a goal to the club, as they knew how hard it would be to score one back for themselves. Montero played at both center back and left back during this period, forming impressive defensive partnerships with the likes of Ciro Ferrara, Mark Iuliano, Gianluca Pessotto, Lilian Thuram, Alessandro Birindelli, Igor Tudor, Gianluca Zambrotta, Nicola Legrottaglie, and Fabio Cannavaro during his 10-year tenure with the club. After the 2004–05 Serie A triumph, Montero and teammate Ferrara called it quits on their Juventus careers. The Uruguayan opted to return to South America, while Ferrara retired. Montero made over 200 appearances for i bianconeri, scoring one league goal. In the 2003 UEFA Champions League Final, Montero was one of the three Juventus players to have their penalty saved by A.C. Milan keeper Dida in the shootout defeat.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1998-1999


Champions League


Match Worn & Signed Shirt


Montero Paolo

JUVENTUS F.C.


1998-1999


Match Worn Shirt


Peruzzi Angelo

Did you Know?

Originally this shirt had white name and number on the back. After the first match UEFA made the team turning them in to the black color since the previous white color was not visible on the shirts.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1998-1999


Champions League


Galatasaray vs Juventus


Team Pennant


Did you Know?

In the season 1998-1999 the Champions League match between Juventus and Turkey’s Galatasaray has been postponed because of escalating tensions between the two countries. The game was scheduled for Wednesday, 25 November, in Istanbul but Uefa delayed it by a week to 2 December.Relations have been strained over Italy’s refusal to extradite the Kurdish separatist leader Abdullah Ocalan for trial in Turkey. Despite safety assurances from Turkish Prime Minister Mesut Yilmaz, Juventus players had threatened to refuse to play if the game went ahead as planned. Team captain Angelo Di Livio said: “We could decide not to go to Istanbul. We really do not want to risk our lives.” Midfielder Zinedine Zidane told La Stampa: “I’m not ashamed to say that I’m scared and I’m really not convinced about going to Turkey.”

JUVENTUS F.C.


1998-1999


Champions League


Manchester United vs Juventus


Team Pennant


Things to Know:

The season 1999-2000 started for Juventus with the Intertoto Cup in order to access to the Uefa Cup main tournament. The team won for the first time in its history the Cup, beating the french team of Rennes.

Watch the Interoto Cup Final highlights against Rennes

Did you Know?

The UEFA Intertoto Cup, also abbreviated as UI Cup and originally called the International Football Cup was a summer football competition for European clubs that had not qualified for one of the two major UEFA competitions, the Champions League and the UEFA Cup. The competition was discontinued after the 2008 tournament. Teams who originally would have entered the Intertoto Cup now directly enter the qualifying stages of the UEFA Europa League from this point. The tournament was founded in 1961–62, but was only taken over by UEFA in 1995. Any club who wished to participate had to apply for entry, with the highest placed clubs (by league position in their domestic league) at the end of the season entering the competition. The club did not have to be ranked directly below the clubs which had qualified for another UEFA competition; if the club which was in that position did not apply, they would not be eligible to compete, with the place instead going to the club which did apply. The cup billed itself as providing both an opportunity for clubs who otherwise would not get the chance to enter the UEFA Cup and as an opportunity for sports lotteries (or pools) to continue during the summer. This reflects its background, which was as a tournament solely for football pools. In 1995, the tournament came under official UEFA sanctionin and UEFA Cup qualification places were granted. Initially, two were provided; this was increased to three after one year; but in 2006, it was again increased to the final total of 11.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1999-2000


Intertoto Cup Final


Match Worn Shirt


Iuliano Mark

Things to Know:

For this competition the team used the shirt with SONY sponsor printed on a plastic strip ironed on the shirt. The reason was that the team’s supplier Kappa didn’t have ready yet the regular shirts, used during the Uefa Cup competition, with the sponsor as part of the fabric. The Intertoto Cup is played starting early July and it frequently happens that teams don’t get the full completed kits on time. 

JUVENTUS F.C.


1999-2000


Friendly Pre Season


Match Worn Shirt

JUVENTUS F.C.


1999-2000


Match Worn Shirt


Esnaider Juan

Things to Know:

Juventus came close to adding to its collection of league titles, but in the end, a controversial refereeing decision denied them the title. Juventus led 1–0 at home to Parma in their penultimate match. Parma made a huge effort to equalise, and thought they had got the desired goal when Fabio Cannavaro headed the ball into the back of the net during stoppage time. However, referee Massimo De Santis discovered a foul that was only apparent to him and, despite wild protest from the Parma players, the goal was disallowed. On the last day of the season, title rivals Lazio beat Reggina by 3–0 at home, but Juventus unexpectedly ran into problems at Perugia, where the heavens opened at 0–0 in half-time. Referee Pierluigi Collina nonetheless decided to kick off the game, albeit half an hour too late. Nervous Laziali and players followed the Perugia–Juventus game via radio, hoping that Juventus would be defeated. A draw would mean a re-match between the sides to decide the title, while a win would give Juventus another scudetto. The Juventus players’ efforts were in vain, since Alessandro Calori struck a half-volley into the back of the net with half an hour to go. With Juventus unable to reply, they lost the title in the final round of the season. It was a bitter end to the season for the Turin club, who had led the table for most of the campaign and lost just one of their first 26 matches, only to collapse in the final 8 games (4 losses suffered in those games)

Watch the Perugia-Juventus highlights

Did you Know?

Inzaghi made his Serie A debut when he transferred to Parma in 1995, but scored only twice in 15 league matches. One of these two goals came against one of his former clubs, Piacenza, literally “making him cry”. He added another two goals in European competitions that season. The following season, he moved on to Atalanta, finishing as the Capocannoniere (Serie A’s top scorer) with 24 goals, and scored against every team in the league. He was awarded Serie A Young Footballer of the Year and served as team captain in the last game of the season. Inzaghi, however, was soon on the move once again to his sixth team in seven seasons, this time to Juventus for a reported 23 billion lire. He formed a formidable attacking partnership along with Alessandro Del Piero and Zinedine Zidane, a tandem which would last for four seasons, under managers Marcello Lippi, and subsequently Carlo Ancelotti, marking Inzaghi’s longest stint with one team at the time. During his time with the Bianconeri, he scored two Champions League hat-tricks – against Dynamo Kyiv and Hamburger SV – becoming the first player to do so. During his first season with the club, Inzaghi scored two goals as Juventus beat Vicenza 3–0 in the 1997 Supercoppa Italiana. Juventus won the Scudetto during the 1997–98 season, in which Inzaghi scored 18 goals, including a decisive, Scudetto-winning hat-trick against Bologna. He also scored six goals to help Juventus reach the Champions League final, although they were defeated 1–0 by Real Madrid. The 1998–99 season was less successful for Juventus, as they suffered a defeat in the 1998 Supercoppa Italiana to Lazio, and finished the season with a disappointing seventh place in Serie A. Inzaghi still managed 20 goals in all competitions, finishing the season as the club’s top-scorer; Six of his goals came in the Champions League, as Juventus were eliminated in the semi-finals by eventual champions Manchester United. During the second leg of the semi-finals in Turin, Inzaghi scored two goals in the first ten minutes, but Manchester United eventually managed to come back and win the match 3–2. Inzaghi helped Juventus win the 1999 UEFA Intertoto Cup, scoring five goals in the semi-finals against Rostov, and two in the finals against Rennes, qualifying Juventus for the UEFA Cup that season. Inzaghi scored 15 goals in Serie A as Juventus narrowly missed out on the title to Lazio, suffering a defeat on the final matchday. The following season, Inzaghi managed 11 goals in Serie A as Juventus finished second in the league for the second consecutive season; he also scored five goals in the UEFA Champions League, including a hat-trick in a 4–4 draw against Hamburger SV, although Juventus were eliminated in the first round. With 16 goals in all competitions, he was Juventus’s top goalscorer for the third consecutive season. However, his once excellent partnership with Del Piero had become less effective in recent seasons, due to their lack of understanding, individualism, and their strained relationship both on and off the pitch.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1999-2000


Uefa Cup 


Match Worn Shirt


Inzaghi Filippo

JUVENTUS F.C.


1999-2000


Italy Cup


Juventus vs Lazio


Match Worn Shirt


Rigoni Marco

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This shirt with Canal Satellite was used by the team only few home games of the Italy Cup 1999-2000 like the home games with Lazio S.S. and Napoli S.S.C. This is one of the rarest shirts of the 1990-2000 era. 

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This style of shirt was made in two different versions. The beginning of the season was played with plastic ironed D+ sponsor. The rest of the season was played with D+ sponsor inside the shirt’s fabric. 

JUVENTUS F.C.


1999-2000


Match Worn Shirt


Pessotto Gianluca

JUVENTUS F.C.


1999-2000


Match Worn Shirt


Kovacevic Darko

JUVENTUS F.C.


1999-2000


Uefa Cup 


Iuliano Mark

Regarded as one of the best and most consistent Italian defenders of his generation, Iuliano was a large, tenacious, and strong defender, who excelled in the air, and who was an accomplished man-marker and an experienced tackler; he usually played as a centre-back, although he was a versatile player, who was also capable of playing as a full-back.

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This style of shirt with SONY sponsor was never used during the season.

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After the transfer to Juventus on 1 July 1999, Zambrotta continued his upward momentum under manager Carlo Ancelotti. He made 32 league appearances with one goal in the first season he played for Juventus. On 14 May 2000, the last match day of the season, Juventus missed out on the 1999–2000 Scudetto, as they were defeated 1–0 away at Perugia in the heavy rain, while Lazio got the three points at home by beating Reggina 3–0, and overcame Juventus by a single point. Zambrotta was brought on in the second half in that game and was later given a red card by the referee, Pierluigi Collina.

JUVENTUS F.C.


1999-2000


Match Worn Shirt


Zambrotta Gianluca

JUVENTUS F.C.


1999-2000


Uefa Cup


Match Worn Shirt


Kovacevic Darko

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At the Turin based club, Kovačević found goals in both the Serie A and competitions such as the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Cup becoming their leading European goal scorer, and the top-scorer of the UEFA Cup during the 1999–2000 season, with 10 goals; despite facing competition from the club’s starting attacking parternship of Filippo Inzaghi and Alessandro Del Piero, Kovačević made a total of 44 appearances in all competitions in his first season with the club (27 in Serie A, 3 in the Coppa Italia, and 11 in European competitions), scoring 21 goals in all competitions (eight in Serie A, two in the Coppa Italia, and 11 in European competitions, one of which came in Juventus’s victorious UEFA Intertoto Cup campaign, which enabled them to qualify for the UEFA Cup), including a notable brace in a 2–1 away win over rivals Inter at the San Siro stadium in Milan. Yet the following season, due to the arrival of French striker David Trezeguet, Kovačević found less space in the squad under manager Carlo Ancelotti, making 27 appearances (20 in Serie A), mostly from the bench, and scoring only six goals (five in Serie A). The Juventus management felt Kovačević was underachieving and soon both parties were looking for a move out of Italy, with clubs such as Rangers willing to offer £12m for the Serbian’s services. 

JUVENTUS F.C.


1999-2000


Match Worn Shirt


Van der Sar Edwin

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In 1999, van der Sar’s stature as one of Europe’s top goalkeepers drew attention from Manchester United, who sought a replacement for Peter Schmeichel; however, Van der Sar moved to Italian club Juventus for a fee believed to be in the region of £5 million. He made his debut for The Old Lady in the 1–1 draw with Reggina at the Stadio Delle Alpi. He became the first non-Italian to keep goal for the Turin club. He was the first-choice goalkeeper during his first two seasons in Italy, making 66 Serie A appearances as Juventus finished runners-up in the league twice under Carlo Ancelotti. On the final day of the 1999–2000 season, Juventus lost to Perugia Calcio, allowing Lazio to win the title.

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