Totti Francesco

Francesco Totti, is an Italian former professional footballer who played for Roma. He played primarily as an attacking midfielder or second striker, but could also play as a lone striker or winger. Totti spent his entire career at Roma, winning a Serie A title, two Coppa Italia titles, and two Supercoppa Italiana titles; he is the top goalscorer and the most capped player in the club’s history. Totti also holds the record for the youngest club captain in the history of Serie A. Often referred to as Er Bimbo de Oro (The Golden Boy), L’Ottavo Re di Roma (The Eighth King of Rome), Er Pupone (The Big Baby), Il Capitano (The Captain), and Il Gladiatore (The Gladiator) by the Italian sports media,[5][6] Totti is the second-highest scorer of all time in Italian league history with 250 goals; he also holds the record for the most goals scored in Serie A while playing for a single club. A creative offensive playmaker renowned for his vision, technique, and goalscoring ability, Totti is considered to be one of the greatest Italian players of all time, one of the most talented players of his generation, and Roma’s greatest ever player. He won a record eleven Oscar del calcio awards from the Italian Footballers’ Association: five Serie A Italian Footballer of the Year awards, two Serie A Footballer of the Year awards, two Serie A Goal of the Year awards, one Serie A Goalscorer of the Year award, and one Serie A Young Footballer of the Year award. Totti is the fifth-highest scoring Italian in all competitions, with 316 goals. A 2006 FIFA World Cup winner and UEFA Euro 2000 finalist with Italy, Totti was selected in the All-Star team for both tournaments; he also represented his country at the 2002 World Cup and Euro 2004. He also won several individual awards, notably the 2007 European Golden Shoe and the Golden Foot. In 2004, he was named in the FIFA 100, a list of the world’s greatest living players as selected by Pelé, as part of FIFA’s centenary celebrations. In 2011, Totti was recognised by IFFHS as the most popular footballer in Europe. In November 2014, Totti extended his record as the oldest goalscorer in UEFA Champions League history, aged 38 years and 59 days.

ROMA A.S.


2000-2001


Match Worn Shirt

Things to Know:

In 2001, Associazione Sportiva Roma took its third league title (after 1942 and 1983), winning Serie A only a year after rivals Lazio. Important signings were the Argentines Walter Samuel, a defender, and Gabriel Batistuta, a top striker. Fabio Capello’s line-up also included Cafu, Vincent Candela, Emerson, Vincenzo Montella and captain Francesco Totti. Capello won Serie A once again when on the last matchday Roma defeated Parma 3–1 at home with Totti, Montella and Batistuta scoring.

Did you Know?

By the 2000–01 campaign under the new coach, Roma were building a competitive team around Totti, who was by now being utilised as a creative attacking midfielder by Capello in a 3–4–1–2 formation, due to his passing skills and playmaking abilities. Totti scored in a 2–0 home win over Bologna on his season debut on 1 October 2000. On 10 December, Totti scored the match-winning goal in a 2–1 home win against Udinese with a powerful left-footed volley to help Roma to their fifth home win of the season. He continued his goalscoring form by scoring against Napoli at home in a 3–0 victory on 28 January 2001, as Roma finished the first half of the league season in first place. Totti continued to play an important role in keeping the club at the top of the table throughout the remainder of the season, gaining a comfortable lead over rivals Juventus. On 17 June 2001, at the Stadio Olimpico, Roma beat Parma 3–1, with their three main attackers, Totti, Vincenzo Montella and Gabriel Batistuta scoring one goal each, as Roma were crowned champions of Italy for the third time in their history. Totti finished the league season with 13 goals, equalling what was at the time his personal goalscoring record in a single Serie A season.

Curiosity:

Back in 2001 top model and actress Ms Ferilli stripped down to a flesh coloured bikini on stage in front of a million people as Roma fans celebrated winning Serie A with a party and concert in the city’s Circo Massimo. She promised she would have done it in case of Scudetto and she kept her word.

ITALY NATIONAL TEAM


2001-2002


Italy vs Hungary


Match Worn Shorts


Did you Know?

In the season 2001-2002 Totti being handed the number 10 shirt and Italy’s playmaking duties, much was expected of Totti in his debut World Cup 2002 under manager Giovanni Trapattoni.

Things to Know:

Totti is regarded as one of the most talented Italian players of all time, and by some as Italy’s greatest player ever. Throughout his career, Totti played predominantly as a classic number 10, functioning either as an offensive-midfield playmaker or as a supporting or deep-lying forward behind the main striker; only in the later years of his Roma career was he mainly employed as a lone striker. An elegant, world-class, and technically gifted attacking midfielder with a good knowledge of the game, Totti was a tactically versatile player, capable of playing anywhere along the front line, and was also occasionally deployed as a winger or as a central midfield playmaker under Zdeněk Zeman, and most notably as a false-9 under Luciano Spalletti and Rudi García. While Totti was a prolific goalscorer, he was also renowned for his ball control, vision, and range of passing, as well as his ability to set the pace in midfield and provide through-balls and assists for his teammates, often through his trademark use of the backheel, in particular when holding up the ball or playing with his back to goal. Throughout his career, Totti drew particular praise from pundits for his vision, precise long passing ability, and technique, which allowed him to play the ball first-time. Due to his movement and wide range of skills, his role has at times been described as that of a hardworking, generous, quick and dynamic centreforward, known as a centravanti di manovra in Italian. Known for his work rate, longevity, and willingness to contribute defensively, Totti underwent an athletic development during his time under Zeman: he undertook a muscle-strengthening programme to adapt to the rhythms of 21st-century football, gaining physical strength, stamina, fitness and shooting power to the detriment of some of his speed and agility, which also enabled him to maintain a consistent level of performance in his later career. Throughout his career, Totti made excellent use of his balance, dribbling skills, and acceleration in order to get past opponents; despite being naturally right-footed, he possessed a powerful and accurate shot from both inside and outside the area with either foot, and was also an accurate penalty kick and free kick taker. Totti also scored several goals from chipped shots throughout his career, and often used the technique on penalties; one of the most famous instances in which Totti performed this type of penalty was in the shootout of Italy’s Euro 2000 semi-final match against the Netherlands. One of his most famous lobbed goals, in which he dribbled past Inter’s Marco Materazzi before chipping the ball over goalkeeper Júlio César, was later named the best goal in Serie A of the 2005–06 season. He scored another notable goal using this technique against Lazio in the 2002 Derby della Capitale, which ended in a 5–1 win for Roma. The title of Totti’s 2006 autobiography Tutto Totti: Mo je faccio er cucchiaio (English: All about Totti: I’m gonna chip him now) referenced this technique, as well as the statement made to his Italy teammates before his memorable Euro 2000 semi-final shootout penalty against the Netherlands. Having served as Roma’s captain for several years, Totti was praised for his leadership. Despite his talent and ability, however, Totti drew criticism at times for his character and lack of discipline on the pitch, which occasionally caused him to commit bad fouls and receive unnecessary bookings; with eleven red cards, he has the joint-sixth highest number of sending offs in Serie A history.

Match Worn Boots


Roma A.S.

Things to Know:

Francesco Totti was used to play with his son’s names on heel/tongue. Chanel (player’s daughter), Cristian (player’s son) and recently Isabel were printed in all of the player/s boots.

Did you Know?

Totti was born in Rome to parents Lorenzo and Fiorella Totti. He was raised in the Porta Metronia neighbourhood. As a youngster he idolised ex-Roma captain Giuseppe Giannini, and regularly played football with older boys. Totti began to play youth team football at the age of 8, with Fortitudo, later joining Smit Trastevere and Lodigiani. After he came to the attention of scouts, his mother refused a lucrative offer from Milan in order to keep him in his home town. Although his youth club initially had come to an agreement to sell Totti to the Lazio youth side, one of Roma’s youth coaches, Gildo Giannini, persuaded his parents to let him join the Roma youth squad in 1989.

Things to Know:

Totti first came into international prominence while playing in FIFA and UEFA youth tournaments. With the Italy under-16 side, under manager Sergio Vatta, Totti reached the final of the 1993 UEFA European Under-16 Championship in Turkey; Italy were defeated 1–0 by Poland as Totti missed the final due to suspension. Four months later, Totti played in 1993 FIFA U-17 World Championship in Japan and scored Italy’s goal in the tournament as the Azzurrini were eliminated in group stage. Totti also scored in Italy’s 4–1 defeat to Spain in the final of the UEFA Under-18 Championship, in July 1995. He subsequently won the UEFA Under-21 Championship with Italy in 1996, under manager Cesare Maldini; in the final, he opened the scoring as the match ended in a 1–1 draw against Spain, although Italy were able to win the final on penalties. The following year, he also played a key role in helping Italy to win a gold medal at the 1997 Mediterranean Games, on home soil, scoring twice throughout the tournament. Due to his contribution in these tournaments, Totti was later included in the all-time Under-21 EURO dream team in 2015. After starring with the Azzurrini in Italy’s under-16, under-19, and under-21 sides, Totti earned his first senior cap for Italy under the recently appointed international manager Dino Zoff during a 2–0 Euro 2000 qualifying victory against Switzerland on 10 October 1998. Totti scored his first goal for Italy on 26 April 2000 in a 2–0 friendly win over Portugal in Reggio Calabria. He scored his first brace for Italy in a 2006 FIFA World Cup qualification match in a 4–3 home win over Belarus, on 13 October 2004. In total, Totti made 58 appearances for Italy between 1998 and 2006, scoring nine goals.

ITALY NATIONAL TEAM


2003-2004


Match Worn Shirt


“Totti is the world’s number one. He represents Italian football and the Italian fans will have fun with him” Diego Armando Maradona

Did you Know?

Totti was known for his exuberant and humorous goal celebrations. One of his famous celebrations took place on 11 April 1999 in the second Derby della Capitale of the 1998–99 season, in which he scored during the final minutes of the game and celebrated by flashing a T-shirt under his jersey, which read “Vi ho purgato ancora” (“I’ve purged you guys again”), in reference to events at the previous derby against Lazio on 29 November 1998 when Totti helped Roma come back from 3–1 down with an assist to Eusebio Di Francesco for 3–2 and finally a goal of his own for 3–3. Another derby goal against Lazio saw him take over a sideline camera and aim it at the Roma fans. Totti has displayed numerous T-shirts with messages on them from under his jersey over the years, including two for his wife; “6 Unica” (“You’re One of a kind”) and “6 Sempre Unica” (“You’re Still the One”), and a political one “Liberate Giuliana” (“Free Giuliana”) in honor of Giuliana Sgrena, an Italian journalist kidnapped in 2005 by insurgents in Iraq who was later freed. The most recent message was “Scusate il Ritardo” (“Sorry for the delay”) which he flashed on 8 January 2012 as an apology to fans for his goalscoring drought after scoring his first goal of the season versus Chievo. As a tribute to his then-pregnant wife, Ilary Blasi, Totti imitated a childbirth scene by stuffing the ball under his shirt and lying on his back while his teammates extracted the ball. His current ritual of sucking his thumb after a goal began after his son was born and continued after the birth of his daughter. Blasi has revealed that Totti also sucks his thumb in dedication to her and not just for their children. On 11 January 2015, Totti scored twice against Lazio in the Derby della Capitale as Roma came back from 2–0 down; he then took a selfie with Roma fans.

Did you Know?

The Totti’s famous selfie goal celebration during the “derby” against Lazio became a one-of-a-kind celebration in football history and an authentic masterpiece for Roma’s fans. It was included amongst the goal celebrations available for FIFA 16 and Pro Evolution Soccer 2016; he also took a selfie in the official trailer of the video game on YouTube.

ITALY NATIONAL TEAM


Fifa World Cup “GERMANY 2006”


Match Worn Shirt


Did you Know?

Despite injury troubles, Totti recovered in time to join the national team for their victorious 2006 World Cup campaign, despite a lack of match practice during his three months on the sidelines. Italy manager Marcello Lippi showed enormous faith in Totti, assuring him during his rehabilitation that his spot in Italy’s World Cup squad was secure and to focus on recuperating. This encouragement and show of faith fueled Totti’s desire to work even harder to overcome what could have been a career-ending injury and make it to the World Cup against all odds (and much of the Italian media’s opinion). Totti did recuperate in time and was eventually named to Lippi’s final 23-man squad for the 2006 World Cup. Despite initial concerns over his match fitness, Totti was an important player in Marcello Lippi’s team, and played in all seven games for Italy, including the victorious final against France, which Italy won on penalties, although he was substituted off in the 61st minute. He played the entire time in Germany with metal plates and screws in his ankle that had yet to be removed following the surgery. Throughout the tournament, he usually played as an attacking midfielder, in front of deep-lying playmaker Andrea Pirlo, and behind strikers Luca Toni, Alberto Gilardino, Vincenzo Iaquinta, or Filippo Inzaghi; these players were supported defensively by Gennaro Gattuso, Simone Perrotta and Daniele De Rossi in midfield. Totti finished the tournament with the joint-highest number of assists, along with his teammate Pirlo, Juan Román Riquelme, Bastian Schweinsteiger, and Luís Figo (4). Totti set up Pirlo’s goal from a short corner in Italy’s opening 2–0 win against Ghana, Marco Materazzi’s goal from a corner in Italy’s final group match, a 2–0 win against the Czech Republic, and two goals in a 3–0 win against Ukraine in the quarter-finals: the opener by Gianluca Zambrotta, and one of Luca Toni’s goals. Totti also scored a goal via an injury-time penalty in Italy’s 1–0 round of 16 win over Australia on 26 June, and was involved in Del Piero’s last-minute extra-time goal in the semi-final, which sealed a 2–0 victory for the Italians over hosts Germany, and a place in the World Cup final. Throughout the competition, Totti completed 185 passes and took 19 shots; in recognition of a successful tournament, he was selected for the 23-man All-Star Team.

“A great player! What a phenomenon!” Leo Messi

Fifa World Cup “GERMANY 2006”


Italy National Team


Did you Know?

Totti intended to retire from international football after the 2006 World Cup, but reneged on his decision and remained undecided on his future for over a year, not being called up in the meantime. He made his retirement official on 20 July 2007, at the beginning of the 2007–08 Serie A season, due to recurring physical problems and in order to focus solely on club play with Roma. Italy’s coach at the time, Roberto Donadoni, attempted to get Totti to change his mind for the remaining Euro 2008 qualifiers but was not successful.

2018-10-30T11:27:24+00:00