“Pelè” Edson Arantes do Nascimento

Edson Arantes do Nascimento known as Pelé, is a retired Brazilian professional footballer who played as a forward. He is widely regarded as the greatest football player of all time. In 1999, he was voted World Player of the Century by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics (IFFHS). That same year, Pelé was elected Athlete of the Century by the International Olympic Committee. According to the IFFHS, Pelé is the most successful league goal-scorer in the world, scoring 1281 goals in 1363 games, which included unofficial friendlies and tour games. During his playing days, Pelé was for a period the best-paid athlete in the world. Pelé began playing for Santos at age 15 and the Brazil national football team at 16. During his international career, he won three FIFA World Cups: 1958, 1962 and 1970, being the only player ever to do so. Pelé is the all-time leading goalscorer for Brazil with 77 goals in 92 games. At club level he is also the record goalscorer for Santos, and led them to the 1962 and 1963 Copa Libertadores. Pelé’s “electrifying play and penchant for spectacular goals” made him a star around the world, and his club team Santos toured internationally in order to take full advantage of his popularity. Since retiring in 1977, Pelé has been a worldwide ambassador for football and has made many acting and commercial ventures. In 2010, he was named the Honorary President of the New York Cosmos. Pelé has also been known for connecting the phrase “The Beautiful Game” with football. A prolific goalscorer, Pelé was known for anticipating his opponents’ movements in the field, and being able to shoot strong and accurate shots with both feet. Early in his career, he played in a variety of attacking formations. In his later career, he played in a playmaking role behind offensive strikers. In Brazil, he is hailed as a national hero for his accomplishments in football and for his outspoken support of policies that improve the social conditions of the poor. Throughout his career and in his retirement, Pelé received several individual and team awards for his performance in the field, his record-breaking achievements, and legacy in the sport.


SANTOS F.C.


Torneio Amazonia 1968


Fast Clube-AM vs Santos


August 9th 1968


Match Worn Unwashed & Signed Shirt


Did you Know?

This shirt was worn by Pelè during the game Fast Clube-AM vs Santos of the “Torneio Amazonia 1968” which took place in Manaus (Amazonas – Brazil) on August 9th 1968. It was a friendly tournament organized by Flaviano Limongi former President of the Federação Amazonense de Futebol (Amazonas Football Federation). Santos team, led by Pelè, went to play in Manaus for the first time in its history. Santos played two games. The first one against Fast Clube-AM on August 9th and the second one took place on August 11th against Nacional-AM. Santos defeated both teams, 3-0 against Fast Clube-AM and 2-1 the Nacional-AM team. With this shirt Pelè scored his goal number 914 of his incredible career. Pelè after the match gave the shirt still wet and dirty to the President Flaviano Limongi and he signed and dedicated it with the following words: “Para meu amigo President Flavio um abraço – 9/8/68”. The shirt was never washed and it became part of the President Flaviano Limongi personal sport collection. Flaviano Limongi had his own project to open a Sport Museum in Manaus but he never did due the missed promises made during the years by the local government to make it happen inside the Arena de Amazonia for the World Cup 2014 in Brazil. The Museum never opened and Flaviano Limongi passed in 2013 leaving his collection to his relatives, who we got this shirt from, after it was announced that the Museum would have never happened. Read the story of the missed Sport Museum in Manaus here: 

https://www.acritica.com/channels/esportes/news/prometido-ha-tempos-museu-do-futebol-amazonense-cai-no-esquecimento

The Pele shirt while it was part of the Flaviano Limongi personal collection

Did you Know?

When NASL commissioner Phil Woosnam and the general secretary of the U.S. Soccer Federation Kurt Lamb wanted to take Pelè to New York Cosmos is because they did a survey on Pele’s fame around the world. Surveys revealed that Pelè was internationally better known that Coca-Cola back to the early 70’s. 

Things to Know:

This trophy comes from “PELE’ – THE COLLECTION” auction. It was a charity auction made by Pele himself through “Julien’s Auction” in London on June 7th-8th-9th 2016. Pelè auctioned off his entire collection of awards and memorabilia accumulated over six decades in the game. More than 2,000 items went under the hammer, covering the years from when Pelé turned professional at 15 with Santos FC in 1956 to being named as the club’s lifetime global ambassador in 2014. Pelé said: “Having donated a significant portion of my collection to the city of Santos, I have decided to allow fans and collectors to own a piece of my history as well. “I hope they treasure these artefacts and share my story with their children and generations to come. I will also be donating a portion of the proceeds from the auction to Pequeno Principe, the largest paediatric hospital in Brazil.”

Personal Owned Trophy


“Key to the City”


Kingston (Jamaica)


January 31st 1971


Santos F.C.

Did you Know?

This trophy was given to Pelè on February 1st 1971 by the Mayor of Kingston (Jamaica) Councillor Emerson Barrett, before the start of an exhibition match between Santos of Brazil and a Cavalier Invitational team at the National Stadium. The game ended in a 1-1 draw-file. This is an amazing trophy considering that it is aged early 70’s. It is an openable leather hand stitched soccer ball with inside an old style wooden key representing the key to the City of Kingston. The key is presented on a green velvet base. The trophy has a wooden base with an engraved silver tag saying: “Presented to Edson Arantes do Nascimento”. During this trip Santos played against the Cavalier Invitational Team and against Chelsea. According with “Once in a Lifetime: The Incredible Story of the New York Cosmos” book by Gavin Newsham it was during this trip that NASL commissioner Phil Woosnam and the general secretary of the U.S. Soccer Federation Kurt Lamb flew to Kingston to meet Pelè and his adviser,  Professor Julio Mazzei, and trying to sign him for the New York Cosmos. After the game against Chelsea they met Pelè and his advisor by the pool of Pele’s hotel and they tried to convince him that he was the only man on the planet who could sell soccer to the American masses. The considered Pelè another Frank Sinatra or Aretha Franklyn, internationally more famous than Muhammad Ali or Joe Di Maggio. He was the only name they wanted for the upcoming NASL season. “I told him he had to come to America because he would have the chance to do something no one else could do, make soccer a major sport in the U.S.A.” recalls Clive Toye

Did you Know?

In 1958 Pelé played his first World Cul while he was 18 years old. He arrived in Sweden sidelined by a knee injury but on his return from the treatment room, his colleagues stood together and insisted upon his selection. His first match was against the USSR in the third match of the first round of the 1958 FIFA World Cup, where he gave the assist to Vavá’s second goal. He was the youngest player of that tournament, and at the time the youngest ever to play in the World Cup. Against France in the semifinal, Brazil was leading 2–1 at halftime, and then Pelé scored a hat-trick, becoming the youngest in World Cup history to do so.  On 29 June 1958, Pelé became the youngest player to play in a World Cup final match at 17 years and 249 days. He scored two goals in that final as Brazil beat Sweden 5–2 in Stockholm, the capital. His first goal where he flicked the ball over a defender before volleying into the corner of the net, was selected as one of the best goals in the history of the World Cup. Following Pelé’s second goal, Swedish player Sigvard Parlingwould later comment; “When Pelé scored the fifth goal in that Final, I have to be honest and say I felt like applauding”. When the match ended, Pelé passed out on the field, and was revived by Garrincha. He then recovered, and was compelled by the victory to weep as he was being congratulated by his teammates. He finished the tournament with six goals in four matches played, tied for second place, behind record-breaker Just Fontaine, and was named best young player of the tournament. It was in the 1958 World Cup that Pelé began wearing a jersey with number 10. The event was the result of disorganization: the leaders of the Brazilian Federation did not send the shirt numbers of players and it was up to FIFA to choose the number 10 shirt to Pelé who was a substitute on the occasion. The press proclaimed Pelé the greatest revelation of the 1958 World Cup, and he was also retroactively given the Silver Ball as the second best player of the tournament, behind Didi.

Personal Owned Trophy


“Sindicato dos Jornalistas Profissionals No Est. de S.Paulo”


“1000th Goal” Player’s Trophy


November 19th 1969


Santos F.C.

Did you Know?

On 19 November 1969, Pelé scored his 1000th goal in all competitions, in what was a highly anticipated moment in Brazil. The goal, popularly dubbed O Milésimo (The Thousandth), occurred in a match against Vasco da Gama, when Pelé scored from a penalty kick, at the Maracanã Stadium. It was 11.11pm on November 19th 1969. Pele jogged up, stuttered, and attempted to pass the ball, right-footed, into the bottom-left corner. The goalkeeper Andrada flung himself south-west but, despite getting a hand to the ball, could not keep it out. Pele raced into the back of the net to seize the ball, as innumerable reporters whizzed on to the pitch to immortalise his reaction.Pele raced into the back of the net to seize the ball, as innumerable reporters whizzed on to the pitch to immortalise his reaction. Some spectators ran up to Pele and presented him with a Vasco jersey with 1000 on the back. O Rei (The King) put it on and did a lap of honour, accompanied by the masses, incessantly kissing the ball and in tears. Andrada also cried – inconsolably. “I was distraught,” said the goalkeeper who went on to embrace conceding Pele’s 1,000th goal. “I was desperate the save the penalty. I didn’t want to be that goalkeeper at all.” So overwhelming were the scenes that the action took around 25 minutes to resume. When it did, Santos held on to win 2-1. Nobody really cared. 19 November 1969 was all about one of the most symbolic goals in football history.

  

Watch above Pele’s 1000th Goal and Celebration

Things to Know:

This award was given to the Pelè by the”Professional Journalists of Santos” (Sindacatos dos Jornalistas Profissionals do Santos) to celebrate Pele’s 1000th goal. The trophy features the Journalist’s metal logo on a marble base with an engraved metal tag saying : ” Ao Pelè, mil abraços dos Jornalistas de Santos – 19/11/1969″ – translated (To Pelè, 1000 hugs from Santos journalists – November 19th 1969). This trophy also comes from “PELE’ – THE COLLECTION” auction. 

“Pelé was one of the few who contradicted my theory: instead of 15 minutes of fame, he will have 15 centuries” Andy Warhol

Things to Know:

Pelé was the most famous footballer in the world during the 1970 World Cup in Mexico. The 1970 World Cup was expected to be Pelé’s last. Brazil’s squad for the tournament featured major changes in relation to the 1966 squad. Players like Garrincha, Nilton Santos, Valdir Pereira, Djalma Santos and Gilmar had already retired. However, Brazil’s 1970 World Cup squad, which included players like Pelé, Rivelino, Jairzinho, Gérson, Carlos Alberto Torres, Tostão and Clodoaldo, is often considered to be the greatest football team in history. The front five of Jairzinho, Pelé, Gerson, Tostão and Rivelino together created an attacking momentum, with Pelé having a central role in Brazil’s way to the final. All of Brazil’s matches in the tournament (except the final) were played in Guadalajara, and in the first match against Czechoslovakia, Pelé gave Brazil a 2–1 lead, by controlling Gerson’s long pass with his chest and then scoring. In this match Pelé attempted to lob goalkeeper Ivo Viktor from the half-way line, only narrowly missing the Czechoslovak goal. Brazil went on to win the match, 4–1. In the first half of the match against England, Pelé nearly scored with a header that was saved by the England goalkeeper Gordon Banks. In the second half, he controlled a cross from Tostão before flicking the ball to Jairzinho who scored the only goal. Against Romania, Pelé scored two goals, with Brazil winning by a final score of 3–2. In the quarterfinals against Peru, Brazil won 4–2, with Pelé assisting Tostão for Brazil’s third goal. In their semi-final match, Brazil faced Uruguay for the first time since the 1950 World Cup final round match. Jairzinho put Brazil ahead 2–1, and Pelé assisted Rivelino for the 3–1. During that match, Pelé made one of his most famous plays. Tostão passed the ball for Pelé to collect which Uruguay’s goalkeeper Ladislao Mazurkiewicz took notice of and ran off his line to get the ball before Pelé. However, Pelé got there first and fooled Mazurkiewicz with a feintby not touching the ball, causing it to roll to the goalkeepers left, while Pelé went to the goalkeepers right. Pelé ran around the goalkeeper to retrieve the ball and took a shot while turning towards the goal, but he turned in excess as he shot, and the ball drifted just wide of the far post. Brazil played Italy in the final at the Azteca Stadium in Mexico City. Pelé scored the opening goal with a header over Italian defender Tarcisio Burgnich. He then made assists on Brazil’s third goal, scored by Jairzinho, and the fourth finished by Carlos Alberto. The last goal of the game is often considered the greatest team goal of all time because it involved all but two of the team’s outfield players. The play culminated after Pelé made a blind pass that went into Carlos Alberto’s running trajectory. He came running from behind and struck the ball to score. Brazil won the match 4–1, keeping the Jules Rimet Trophy indefinitely, and Pelé received the Golden Ball as player of the tournament. Burgnich, who marked Pelé during the final, was quoted saying “I told myself before the game, he’s made of skin and bones just like everyone else — but I was wrong”. Pelé’s last international match was on 18 July 1971 against Yugoslavia in Rio de Janeiro. With Pelé on the field, the Brazilian team’s record was 67 wins, 14 draws and 11 losses. Brazil never lost a match while fielding both Pelé and Garrincha.

Did you Know?

Pelé has also been known for connecting the phrase “The Beautiful Game” with football. A prolific goalscorer, he was known for his ability to anticipate opponents in the area and finish off chances with an accurate and powerful shot with either foot. Pelé was also a hard-working team-player, with exceptional vision and intelligence, who was recognised for his precise passing, and ability to link-up with teammates and provide them with assists. In his early career, he played in a variety of attacking positions. Although he usually operated inside the penalty area as a main striker or centre-forward, his wide range of skills also allowed him to play in a more withdrawn role, as an inside forward or second striker, or out wide. In his later career, he took on more of a deeper playmaking role behind the strikers, often functioning as an attacking midfielder. Pelé’s unique playing style combined speed, creativity, and technical skill with physical power, stamina, and athleticism. His excellent technique, balance, flair, agility, and dribbling skills enabled him to beat opponents with the ball, and frequently saw him use sudden changes of direction and elaborate feints in order to get past players, such as his trademark move, the drible da vaca Another one of his signature moves was the paradinha, or little stop. In spite of his relatively small stature, 1.73 metres (5.7 ft), he excelled in the air, due to his heading accuracy and elevation. Renowned for his bendingshots, he was also an accurate free-kick taker, and penalty taker, although he often refrained from taking penalties, stating that he believed it to be a cowardly way to score.

Airlines Mileage Cards & Hotel Fidelity Cards


Personal Owned & Used


Did you Know?

These Airlines Mileage’s cards and Hotel fidelity cards were owned by Pelè and auctioned during his “Pelè:The Collection” auction in London. During the 3 days of the auction, from June 7th to June 9th 2015 many other personal Pelè items were auctioned. A special replica World Cup trophy presented to Pele fetched £395.000 Two of the 75-year-old Brazil legend’s three World Cup winners medals also went under the hammer selling for well over their estimated price going for a collective price of £340,000. However, the Jules Rimet trophy was the most expensive individual lot with Swiss watchmaking giant Hublot timing their final bid perfectly for an item which had been figured to fetch between £281,000 to £450,000. Pele’s medal from his first World Cup victory in 1958 when he was just a teenager sold for £200,000 way over the estimated price of £70,000-140,000.

Did you Know?

Pelé has published several autobiographies, starred in documentary films, and composed musical pieces, including the soundtrack for the film Pelé in 1977. He appeared in the 1981 film Escape to Victory, about a World War II-era football match between Allied prisoners of war and a German team. Pelé starred alongside other footballers of the 1960s and 1970s, with actors Michael Caine, and Sylvester Stallone. in 1969, Pelé starred in a telenovela called Os Estranhos, about first contact with aliens. It was created to drum up interest in the Apollo missions. In 2001, had a cameo role in the satire film, Mike Bassett: England Manager.

Did you Know?

Pelè is included in our “Ballon d’Or” section even if he never won it while he was playing. But it’s important to know that to coincide with the 60th anniversary of the Ballon d’Or in 2016, France Football published a reevaluation of the awards presented before 1995, when only European players were eligible to win the award. 12 out of the 39 Ballons d’Or presented during this time period would have been awarded to South American players; Pelè in addition to Maradona, Garrincha, Mario Kempes and Romário, were retrospectively recognized as worthy winners. The original recipients, however, remain unchanged. Maradona and Pelé received honorary “Ballons d’Or for Services to Football” in 1996 and 2013, respectively.

2018-10-22T13:38:15+00:00