ITALY NATIONAL TEAM


1995-1996


Euro 96 Qualifying Game


Italy vs Estonia 


Match Worn Shirt


Minotti Lorenzo


The wrist band of 1996 Nike shirt with the color of the Italian flag.

ITALY NATIONAL TEAM


1995-1996


Euro 96 Qualifying Game


Italy vs Ukraine 


Match Worn Shirt


Berti Nicola


Did you Know?

Starting January 1st 1995 the Italian Team changed the technical supplier from Diadora to Nike. This away model together with the blue model above were the first two Nike models used by the team. They were then changed in 1996 with the Euro 1996 kits.

ITALY NATIONAL TEAM


Euro 96


Match Worn Shirt


Albertini Demetrio

Did you Know?

Italy went to the European championship in England as vice-world champions and many saw Sacchi’s team as the key contender for the title along with Germany, and saw Albertini as Italy’s key player, wearing the number 10 shirt. However, the tournament ended in frustration for the Italians. Arrigo Sacchi’s team selection for the second group game against Czech Republic was based on the presumption that, after the victory over Russia and in the light of the upcoming clash with Germany, Italy could afford playing without a series of key players including Albertini. Italy lost 2–1 to the Czech Republic and then were knocked out of the tournament following a 0–0 draw with future champions Germany, a match the “Azurri” dominated thanks to Albertini’s presence in midfield. Sacchi in one of his interviews admitted the early departure was due to his mistakes and the 1996 squad was his best Italy team, even better than the one that got the second place in USA 1994.

Things to Know:

This style of shirt was only used during Euro 96. The regular style of shirt had the “ITALIA” writing on the bottom of the back side. UEFA just few days before Euro 1996 didn’t allow the team to play with the regular version of the shirt so the team had to hide the “ITALIA” printing. Since the shirts were already prepared for the match, during the first game the team played with a white patch on the bottom of the back in order to cover up the ÏTALIA” writing. Since the second game instead, Nike made this kind of shirts with nothing printed on the back. Take a look at the regular shirts below, used for the Fifa World Cup “France 98” qualifying game to check the differences.

Did you Know?

Euro 96 was the first tournament where teams played with patches on sleeves. On the left sleeve there was the competition patch. On the right sleeve there was the well known “FAIR PLAY” patch. This white shirt was issued for the team but never used because Italy played all the three games of the group’s stage with classical home sky blue shirt.

ITALY NATIONAL TEAM


Euro 96


Match Issued Shirt


Donadoni Roberto

ITALY NATIONAL TEAM


Olympic Games “ATLANTA 96”


Match Worn Shirt


Bernardini Antonino


 

Did you Know?

Antonino Bernardini is an Italian football manager and former footballer, who played as a midfielder.Bernardini was a member of the Italy national under-21 football team that won the 1996 UEFA European Under-21 Championship; he also took part at the Summer Olympics later that year.

ITALY NATIONAL TEAM


1996-1997


Friendly


Italy vs Bosnia and Herzegovina


Match Worn Shirt


Maldini Paolo

Did you Know?

Although he played as a left back for most of his career, Maldini was naturally right footed, and began playing for Milan as a right back. He was switched to the left back position by manager Arrigo Sacchi due to the presence of Mauro Tassotti on the right for Milan. This was made possible due to Maldini’s tactical versatility and ability with both feet, which allowed him to play anywhere along the backline, and have a long and successful professional career, both with Milan and Italy. Maldini was renowned for his technical ability, athleticism, sliding tackles, stamina, composure and fast energetic forward runs as a left-back or wing-back. He was also an excellent crosser of the ball, and was an effective attacking threat, scoring and assisting several goals throughout his career. In the final few years of his career, as he lost speed, he was moved to a centre-back position, where he excelled in relying on his experience, tactical ability, positioning and timing to win the ball. Maldini was renowned for his technical ability, athleticism, sliding tackles, stamina, composure and fast energetic forward runs as a left-back or wing-back. He was also an excellent crosser of the ball, and was an effective attacking threat, scoring and assisting several goals throughout his career. In the final few years of his career, as he lost speed, he was moved to a centre-back position, where he excelled in relying on his experience, tactical ability, positioning and timing to win the ball.

Did you Know?

Chiesa played for the Italian team from 1996 to 2001, collecting a total of 22 caps with 7 goals. Chiesa made his senior international debut in a 2–2 friendly draw against Belgium on 29 May 1996 in Cremona, marking the occasion with a goal. He was subsequently selected by manager Arrigo Sacchi to play for Italy at the UEFA Euro 1996 tournament later that year, ahead of other established strikers such as Roberto Baggio, Gianluca Vialli, and Giuseppe Signori. Chiesa appeared in two group stage matches, the first in a 2–1 defeat against the Czech Republic, where he scored Italy’s only goal of the match, and the second in a 0–0 draw against Germany, as Italy were eliminated in the first round. He also was called up to the 1998 FIFA World Cup by manager Cesare Maldini as a replacement for Fabrizio Ravanelli. He appeared in Italy’s opening group match of the 1998 World Cup, which ended in a 2–2 draw against Chile, also appearing as a substitute in the 1–0 victory in the round of 16 match against Norway. Italy were eliminated in the quarter finals on penalties by hosts and eventual champions France. Under manager Dino Zoff, Chiesa appeared in Italy’s 6–2 friendly win over the FIFA World Stars on 16 December 1998, organised to commemorate the centenary of the Italian Football Federation, scoring a hat-trick. He also scored a goal in a 4–0 victory over Wales in a European qualifying match in Bologna, on 5 June 1999. He made his final appearance for Italy under Giovanni Trapattoni, in Italy’s 1–0 friendly win over South Africa in Perugia, on 25 April 2001. Alongside Alessandro Del Piero, Chiesa holds the unique record for the most goals scored by an Italian international coming off the bench (5). Chiesa is currently the last player to manage 2 goals in his first two Italy appearances.

ITALY NATIONAL TEAM


1996-1997


Fifa World Cup “France 98” Qualifying Game


Italy vs Moldova


Match Worn Shirt


Chiesa Enrico