Lloris Hugo

Hugo Hadrien Dominique Lloris is a French professional footballer who plays as a goalkeeper and is the captain of the French national team. Lloris is described as a goalkeeper who “boasts lightning reflexes and good decision-making” and is “a formidable opponent in one-on-one situations”. Lloris also “commands his box well”. His playing style, and in particular his speed when coming off his line to anticipate opponents and clear the ball, has led him to be described as a sweeper-keeper in the media. He is a three-time winner of the National Union of Professional Footballers (UNFP) Ligue 1 Goalkeeper of the Year award. Lloris began his career with hometown club OGC Nice, made his debut as a teenager in October 2005 and started in goal during the team’s run to the 2006 Coupe de la Ligue Final. After excelling at the club for three seasons, Lloris moved to seven-time Ligue 1 champions Olympique Lyonnais, amid interest from several other clubs, notably Milan. Lloris won several domestic awards in his first season with Lyon and, in his second season, earned award nominations at European level for his performances in the UEFA Champions League, which saw Lyon reach the semi-finals for the first time. Lloris is a French international having represented his nation at under-18, under-19, and under-21 level. Prior to playing at senior level, he played on the under-19 team that won the 2005 European Under-19 Football Championship. Lloris made his senior international debut in November 2008 in a friendly against Uruguay. He helped France qualify for the 2010 FIFA World Cup and was applauded by the media for his performance over two legs against the Republic of Ireland in the qualifying playoffs. He captained the national team for the first time in 2010, and became first-choice captain on 28 February 2012, leading France into the quarter-finals of both Euro 2012 and the 2014 FIFA World Cup, runners-up at Euro 2016, and winners at the 2018 FIFA World Cup.

Match Worn Boots


Tottenham Hotspur F.C. – France National Team


Did you Know?

Lloris has been active on the international front with France, first appearing with the under-18 team making his debut on 11 March 2004 in a friendly match against Germany. He later played with the under-19 team and was part of the winning team at the 2005 European Under-19 Football Championship. Lloris appeared in all five matches the team played in the competition. He made only five appearances with the under-21 team, primarily because of his commitments to the senior team. On 11 October 2008, with the under-21 squad attempting to qualify for the 2009 UEFA European Under-21 Football Championship, coach Erick Mombaerts called up Lloris to the team for their important two-legged playoff against Germany, despite him having been called up to the senior team and the player having last played for the team in August 2007. Lloris honored the call up and started the second leg. With France seconds away from a spot in the tournament, because of the team’s 1–1 draw in the first leg, Germany got a late goal from Benedikt Höwedes. The 1–0 loss eliminated France from the competition and also ended Lloris’s under-21 career. Lloris received his first call-up to the senior national team for France’s 6 February 2008 match against Spain. However, he instead played for the B team in their friendly match against the Congo DR, held the day before the Spain friendly. After receiving several more call ups in 2008, he finally earned his first cap on 19 November 2008 in a 0–0 draw with Uruguay. On 9 September 2009, Lloris received his first international red card, against Serbia, following a foul on Nikola Žigić in the penalty box, despite replays showing otherwise. Lloris returned to the team on 14 October playing the entire 90 minutes in the team’s 3–1 win over Austria. Lloris was applauded by the media and players, alike, for his performance over two legs against the Republic of Ireland that saw France earn a spot in the 2010 FIFA World Cup finals. Former national team goalkeeper Grégory Coupet credited his performance as “phenomenal”, while the French media described him as “Saint Lloris”, which is a play on the nickname of Real Madrid counterpart Iker Casillas, who was considered one of the top goalkeepers in Europe at the time. On 11 May 2010, Lloris was named in Domenech’s 30-man preliminary squad to participate in the 2010 World Cup, later being named to the final 23-man team and installed as first-choice goalkeeper. On 11 June 2010, Lloris made his World Cup finals debut in the team’s opening group stage match against Uruguay, earning a clean sheet in a 0–0 draw. Lloris appeared in both of France’s other group stage matches, against Mexico and hosts South Africa. Against South Africa, Lloris committed a goalkeeping error which resulted in the opening goal for the hosts. He redeemed himself later in the match, however, by producing several saves to limit the South Africans’ chances of progressing to the knockout rounds. France lost the match 2–1, which resulted in the hosts’ elimination from the competition. On 17 November 2010, Lloris captained France, for the first time, in the team’s 2–1 victory over England at Wembley Stadium. After leading France out six more times on an interim basis, on 28 February 2012, he was named first-choice captain of the national team by manager Laurent Blanc ahead of UEFA Euro 2012. Lloris started for his country in the final tournament, as they reached the quarter-finals, where they were eliminated following a 2–0 loss to eventual champions Spain. He started for France at the 2014 World Cup, helping the team to the quarter-finals, where they were defeated 1–0 by eventual champions Germany. Lloris was the starting goalkeeper of the French squad that reached the final of Euro 2016 on home soil, only to be defeated 1–0 by Portugal in extra time. On 2 June 2017, Lloris made his 88th appearance for France in a 5–0 friendly home win over Paraguay, overtaking Fabien Barthez as his nation’s most capped goalkeeper of all time.[88][89] After beating Bulgaria and Belarus in October later that year, Hugo Lloris and the France national team qualified for the 2018 World Cup. On 21 June 2018, Lloris earned his 100th cap in France’s 1–0 win over Peru in their second group stage game of the 2018 FIFA World Cup. Against Uruguay in the quarter-finals, Lloris made a key save from a Martin Caceres header as France won 2–0. On 15 July, he lifted the World Cup trophy as his team’s captain, as France defeated Croatia with a 4–2 victory in the final, despite his mistake which allowed Croatia’s Mario Mandžukić to score a goal as Lloris tried to dribble past him. On 17 November 2018, he made a record of 9 saves in a UEFA Nations League game against Netherlands, which France lost 0–2.

Did you Know?

Lloris was born on 26 December 1986 in the Mediterranean city of Nice to an upper-class family. His mother was a lawyer and his father is a Monte Carlo-based banker of Spanish (Catalan) descent. He has a younger brother, Gautier, who currently plays as a central defender for his older brother’s former club OGC Nice. In 2008, while Lloris was playing for Nice, his mother died. Just two days after her death, he gained national respect for his refusal of a bereavement leave offer from manager Frédéric Antonetti, instead opting to play in a league match for Nice. Lloris performed admirably in the match despite the circumstances. As a youth, like his international and club teammate Yoann Gourcuff, Lloris excelled at tennis and played the sport up until the age of 13. He was among the top players in his age group, ranking high in the country’s national standings before opting to focus on football. On 10 August 2010, Lloris was named, alongside international teammate Karim Benzema, to appear on the cover of the French version of FIFA 11. On 23 September 2010, he announced the birth of his daughter. On 24 August 2018, Lloris was charged with drink-driving after being stopped by police in west London. Lloris later pleaded guilty at Westminster Magistrates’ Court and admitted to being more than twice the drink-drive limit. He was fined £50,000 and banned from driving for 20 months.

2019-05-17T15:47:11+00:00
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